Terrasini Up and Down

Ein kurzer Besuch im November in Terrasini, ein Sturm ist gerade vorbei gezogen, das Meer ist auf gewühlt, man kann nicht baden. Was tun? Ab in die Berge und Pilze suchen..!! Terrasini liegt ca. 30 km westlich von Palermo an der Autobahn A29 nach Trapani zwischen den Bergen und dem Golf vom Castellammare in der Nähe … Continue reading “Terrasini Up and Down”

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Ein kurzer Besuch im November in Terrasini, ein Sturm ist gerade vorbei gezogen, das Meer ist auf gewühlt, man kann nicht baden.

Was tun? Ab in die Berge und Pilze suchen..!!

Terrasini liegt ca. 30 km westlich von Palermo an der Autobahn A29 nach Trapani zwischen den Bergen und dem Golf vom Castellammare in der Nähe des Flughafens Palermo.

Die Stadt ist an die Eisenbahnstrecke Palermo – Trapani angeschlossen.

Die Einwohner arbeiten hauptsächlich in der Landwirtschaft, in der Fischerei und im Tourismus.

Die Nachbargemeinden sind Carini, Cinisi, Partinico und Trappeto.

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Sicilia Fuocoammare

Gianfranco Rosi Fuocoammare è stato premiato con l’Orso d’oro al festival internazionale del cinema di Berlino. È un orso d’oro meritato a un film decisamente contemporaneo, che si spera faccia riflettere gli spettatori incitandoli a una maggiore sensibilità nei confronti di un problema che ci riguarda tutti.

Il film di Gianfranco Rosi Fuocoammare è stato premiato con l’Orso d’oro al festival internazionale del cinema di Berlino. È un orso d’oro meritato a un film decisamente contemporaneo, che si spera faccia riflettere gli spettatori incitandoli a una maggiore sensibilità nei confronti di un problema che ci riguarda tutti da molto, molto vicino.

 

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www.lifeboatproject.eu

Healthy & Safe in Sicily

While in general you don’t have a lot to worry about in Sicily, here are a few pieces of information which may help to both prepare you and set your mind at rest.

Staying Safe And Healthy In Sicily

Sicily is an idyllic holiday destination, but any travel abroad can raise worries for some. How safe is the destination? What’s the healthcare provision like? What precautions and knowledge is relevant here which we may not need at home. While in general you don’t have a lot to worry about in Sicily, here are a few pieces of information which may help to both prepare you and set your mind at rest.

How Safe Is Sicily?

How Safe Is Sicily?

A million Mafia movies have given Sicily a bit of a dubious reputation when it comes to crime – albeit a rather glamorously dubious reputation, with a Hollywood shine to it. Many travellers to Sicily turn up insured to the nines, fully expecting to be held-up by a Mafiosi as soon as they step off the plane. In truth, this isn’t strictly necessary. While a bit of personal cover is no bad idea, wherever you’re going, Sicily is in fact considered one of the world’s safer destinations. If you do meet a Mafiosi, you’re unlikely to know it, and they’re unlikely to involve you in a crime! In fact, many Sicilians will be offended if you babble on about the Mafia, so, as a courtesy, do try not to imply that they’re all members of organised crime rings!  As in any tourist-heavy destination, there is a degree of pickpocketing, particularly during busy seasons, so keep an eye on your belongings. But don’t get paranoid – getting your pocket picked in Palermo is far less likely than getting your pocket picked in many American cities. It’s also worth noting that chancing it when it comes to change etc is something of a cultural tradition in Sicily, so you may have to hold out for what you see as an ‘honest’ price with vendors. Don’t worry too much about this, though. It’s all in good spirit! It’s also perhaps worth noting that Italian men have something of a reputation with women! Italian flirting culture goes a bit further than many other Western flirting cultures, which may make some women uncomfortable. Don’t be. A simple ‘Mi lasce in pace?’ (‘Will you leave me in peace?’) will usually cause them to back off with apologies.

How Healthy Is Sicily?

There are few health risks in Sicily. Admittedly, the Sicilian roads can be a bit scary – Sicilian drivers appear to have no self-preservation instincts whatsoever! So be careful if you’re hiring a car or crossing the road. The tap water is subject to EU regulations and therefore safe to drink. Italy (including Sicily) has no more dangerous or infectious diseases than any other developed country, and is generally pretty disease-free. If you’re concerned about mosquito or tick borne diseases, take sensible precautions like applying insect repellents and wearing clothing which covers vulnerable areas. If you’re planning to bathe off Sicily’s beautiful beaches, pay attention to warnings etc from the coastguard, don’t get out of your depth, and don’t take stupid risks with the ocean! In general, however, Sicilian beaches are pretty safe.

What If I Should Need Healthcare?

The cost of healthcare in Sicily will vary depending on your personal insurance and any healthcare deals your nation may have with Italy on the subject (if you’re an EU national, a European Health Insurance Card will get you state medical care for free or at a reduced cost. If you’re from Australia, a Medicare card will help you out with Sicilian healthcare). Healthcare in Sicily is not hard to come by, with plentiful pharmacies and good hospital provision in the case of emergency. Anyone in need will get emergency treatment, regardless of nationality or ability to pay – although non-EU citizens may be charged after the fact. Should you need an ambulance, dial 118 or 112. Here’s a basic phrase guide which will help you out in the case of an emergency. Please note that it is an offence in Italy to try and provide healthcare to someone if you do not have medical qualifications or a first aid qualification, so if someone if having an emergency medical situation, the best thing to do is call the emergency services immediately (it’s also an offence not to call the emergency services in the event of a medical emergency!). With any luck, however, you will not have to worry about any of this during your stay in Sicily!

Writing Sicily

Just being surrounded by the ancient and invigorating culture and history of Sicily can be an enormous inspiration. A writer needs certain raw materials to work with, and Sicily supplies these in spades.

Sicily – The Perfect Writing Retreat

For a relatively small island, Sicily packs one hell of an artistic heft. Legions of painters, sculptors, playwrights, poets, and novelists have hailed from, been inspired by, or produced their best works on Sicily. What is it about this island that brings out such a profusion of artistic productivity and excellence? And could Sicily work its magic for you? If you’re a writer in search of the perfect location in which to knuckle down to your magnum opus – a place which will both inspire you and let you work in peace – could Sicily be the answer?

Sicilian WritersSicilian Writers

Modern audiences may be familiar with the detective novels of Andrea Camilleri, featuring the Sicilian Inspector Montalbano. These are enjoyable bestsellers worldwide, and have undergone adaptation for the screen. But the gruff detective is far from the only literary credit to Sicily’s name. Who could forget Guiseppe Tomasi Di Lampedusa’s ‘The Leopard’ – widely considered to be one of the best historical novels ever written. It charts the fortunes of the aristocratic Sicilian Salina family during the Risorgimento– and the island of Sicily itself is just as much of a central player as any of the Lampedusa’s human characters. The great Goethe also sang the praises of Sicily, stating that “To have seen Italy without seeing Sicily is not to have seen Italy at all, for Sicily is the clue to everything”. Not even the peerless poet Coleridge was immune to Sicily’s charms. And let’s not forget the ancestors of modern literature, who also fell under the spell of the muse of Sicily. Ancient poets and playwrights like Aeschylus and Pindar produced their best works in Sicily. Going back even further, the myth-makers who launched Ancient Greek culture chose Sicily for the setting of a pivotal myth – that of the abduction of Persephone. Clearly this is an island which exerts a considerable pull over the poets and storytellers of the world.

Inspirational Sicily

Inspirational Sicily

All writers are different, so it would be wrong to make any generalisations as to why, precisely, Sicily appears to bring out the muse in so many. Some writers like peace and quiet in which to work, while others find isolation with a blank page intimidating and would rather have a little hubbub in the background! Some write as a form of therapy, while others do it to entertain themselves and others. Some write with political purpose, others through a spirit of sheer whimsy. No two writers are the same, so it can’t be stated with any certainty that what has worked for great writers in the past will work for you. However, having said this, Sicily does present a few general advantages for writers. For a start, it’s incredibly beautiful. Since the dawn of human civilization, writers and artists have drawn inspiration from natural beauty, and many modern writers are no exception. Modern science is now backing up this empirical knowledge through studies which appear to prove that spending time in beautiful, natural surroundings really can boost the brain’s creative powers. Sicily is, of course, hardly short of stunning natural landscapes. The congenial climate of Sicily may also help the budding writer. It’s arguably easier to concentrate if your body feels relaxed and happy than it is if your brain is distracted by things like cold and so forth then it’s more difficult to knuckle down to the business of writing.

Creative Culture

Then, of course, there is the cultural factor. Just being surrounded by the ancient and invigorating culture and history of Sicily can be an enormous inspiration. A writer needs certain raw materials to work with, and Sicily supplies these in spades. This is an island of intrigue, romance, tragedy, and comedy. It’s an island of incredible stories, which cannot fail to inspire. Not to mention the fact that today’s writers heading to Sicily will doubtless be aware of the great footsteps they’re treading in. The cultural ghosts of writers past may well draw on new generations to great literary feats. As such, Sicily’s artistic past feeds and perpetuates its future. If you are looking for the perfect location in which to find inspiration or get to work on your creation, Sicily could well be what you’re looking for.

Dive in and explore

This month, you can also explore the fascinating history of the Mediterranean’s largest island in our Sicily exhibition, on until 14 August.

The BP exhibition Sunken cities: Egypt’s lost worlds opens on 19 May. Featuring stunning objects that have been submerged under the sea for a thousand years, it will showcase the rich interaction between ancient Egypt and the Greek world. It’s likely to be very popular, so make sure you book in advance! This month, you can also explore the fascinating history of the Mediterranean’s largest island in our Sicily exhibition, on until 14 August. May is also your last chance to see smaller exhibitions and displays on shoes from the Islamic world, British hoards and the Pacific god A’a